Bunny Owner Explains Why You Shouldnt Get One Before Easter

When people bring a bunny into their home on Easter, they usually don’t stay there very long. In fact, almost 80 percent of bunnies that are up for adoption at shelters were purchased as Easter gifts, MyFoxPhilly.com reports. Sick and tired of these furballs ending up in the wrong hands, Kate has used her pet rabbit Maurie as an example to show the things one has to think about before getting one.

Image credits: MsHissyPants

Recommended For You

Credi Response Pro Monthly

Credi Response Pro version replies to all the comments on a particular fan page. It goes a step ahead and individually uses the visitor's name to post a reply on 100% automation. It has the state of art spin text technology. This means every message that

EASIEST MONEY METHOD - DFY

Fastest and Easiest system brand new newbies are using to make 4-5 fig/m income online.

SociDeck Elite

SociDeck is a feature-packed social media management software that converts social conversations into conversions by allowing users to manage their 3 biggest social media accounts- Facebook, Twitter and Instagram at one place.

Image credits: MsHissyPants

Image credits: MsHissyPants

Image credits: MsHissyPants

Image credits: MsHissyPants

Image credits: MsHissyPants

Image credits: MsHissyPants

Image credits: MsHissyPants

Image credits: MsHissyPants

Image credits: MsHissyPants

Image credits: MsHissyPants

Rabbits are the third most popular pet in America, after cats and dogs, according to the Humane Society of the United States, and the third most abandoned. Most people have an idea of how long cats and dogs live, the kind of care they need, their behaviors. But rabbits? Not so much.

“Bunnies grow very quickly, and they’re not tiny and cute for very long,” Carolyn Gracie of Main Line Animal Rescue told the news source. “Often after a very short time, people abandon them and they end up in shelters, or worse.”

Jennifer McGee, co-manager of the Georgia chapter of House Rabbit Society, a shelter in the southeastern part of the state, told National Geographic they normally receive one to two calls a week about abandoned rabbits. But in the six weeks after Easter, the shelter gets three to four calls a day.

Image credits: MsHissyPants

Image credits: MsHissyPants

And although rabbits can make delightful companions, they’re not easy pets. Not surprisingly, vets and insurance companies consider them exotic pets. That means their medical care can be more expensive than for a cat or dog. Rabbits also need a lot of exercise and shouldn’t live in a cage. This means they need to learn to use a litterbox, which takes patience, just as it does for cats. They’re also prey animals and generally don’t like to be picked up by humans; they prefer to be in control, their feet on the ground.

Other rabbit owners started sharing their own experiences

Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

Thank you for taking the time to read our article.

If you enjoyed our content, we'd really appreciate some "love" with a share or two.

And ... Don't forget to have fun!

Recommended

RewardLeads - Yearly License

RewardLeads allows you to create your own Digital Loyaly Scheme. Get's you more customers, more sales per customer and more subscribers.

Viddyoze Class

Access To Viddyoze Class Course

eLasso - Whitelabel

Sell eLasso as your own software under your own brand and charge any price that you want.

Leave a Reply