Advice4all - Feed https://advice4all.eu news from around Sat, 22 Sep 2018 20:03:33 +0000 en-US https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 https://advice4all.eu/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/cropped-ama-news-logo-1-32x32.pngAdvice4all – news from aroundhttps://advice4all.eu 32 32 75944532 White ex-Texas cop gets 15 years in black teenager’s deathhttps://advice4all.eu/white-ex-texas-cop-gets-15-years-in-black-teenagers-death/ Sat, 22 Sep 2018 20:00:38 +0000 https://advice4all.eu/?p=2440
attorney

Roy Oliver was convicted of murder on Tuesday for fatally shooting an unarmed black teenager when he fired into a car full of teenagers leaving a house party in suburban Dallas.  (AP)

A white former police officer was sentenced to 15 years in prison Wednesday night after being convicted of murder a day earlier for killing an unarmed 15-year-old boy when he fired into a car packed with black teenagers leaving a house party in suburban Dallas.

Roy Oliver, who faced up to life in prison, was convicted Tuesday in the 2017 death of Jordan Edwards and the same jury handed down his punishment. He also was fined $10,000.

The verdict marked an extremely rare murder conviction for shootings involving on-duty police officers. His lawyers are expected to appeal.

Oliver was a police officer in the community of Balch Springs when he and his partner responded to reports of underage drinking at the party. Oliver fired into a car carrying Edwards and his friends, later saying he feared the vehicle was moving toward and endangering his partner . Edwards, who was in the front passenger seat, was shot.

The jury deliberated for hours before settling on a prison sentence. Earlier, they heard from Oliver's mother, Linda, who said he was a good man and a devoted father and asked jurors for a five-year sentence, saying her young grandson needs his father's support.

"He needs his father's love. He needs his father's income. He needs his father's guidance," she said.

Oliver's wife also testified, saying in Spanish through an interpreter that she was concerned about their 3-year-old son, who is autistic. But the ex-officer's half sister testified against him, saying she felt compelled to do so after listening to testimony during the trial and that she hoped he "gets what he deserves."

Balch Springs police

Odell Edwards and Charmaine Edwards, parents of Jordan Edwards, react to a guilty of murder verdict during a trial of fired Balch Springs police officer Roy Oliver.  (AP)

That came a day after Edwards' father, Odell Edwards, told jurors that his son always had a smile on his face and dreamed of playing football at Alabama.

Edwards' stepmother, Charmaine Edwards, said Jordan's death left a void in the family and nothing will make it whole again.

"And I'm forever grateful that y'all (saw) it in your hearts, to see that it was wrong. And I'm thankful," she told jurors after they delivered the murder conviction.

Earlier Wednesday, Dallas County district attorney Faith Johnson said Oliver was a "killer in blue" and told jurors they could send a message that bad officers will not be tolerated.

Police initially said the vehicle backed up toward officers "in an aggressive manner," but later admitted that bodycam video showed the vehicle was moving forward as officers approached. Oliver's partner told jurors he didn't believe his life was ever in danger.

Investigators said no guns were found in the vehicle. Oliver was firedfrom the Balch Springs Police Department days after the shooting.

The jury, which featured two black members out of 12 jurors and two alternates, acquitted Oliver on two lesser charges of aggravated assault stemming from the shooting.

It's extremely rare for police officers to be tried and convicted of murder for shootings that occurred while they are on duty. Only six non-federal police officers have been convicted of murder in such cases — and four of those convictions were overturned — since 2005, according to data compiled by criminologist and Bowling Green State University professor Phil Stinson.

Edwards' father has also filed a civil lawsuit in connection to the shooting. The jury's decision is not just about Jordan Edwards, but all other black men and women who have been killed and not received justice, said Daryl Washington, an attorney for the teenager's father.

Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

=>
***********************************************
See Full Article Here: White ex-Texas cop gets 15 years in black teenager’s death
************************************
=>

]]>
attorney

Roy Oliver was convicted of murder on Tuesday for fatally shooting an unarmed black teenager when he fired into a car full of teenagers leaving a house party in suburban Dallas.  (AP)

A white former police officer was sentenced to 15 years in prison Wednesday night after being convicted of murder a day earlier for killing an unarmed 15-year-old boy when he fired into a car packed with black teenagers leaving a house party in suburban Dallas.

Roy Oliver, who faced up to life in prison, was convicted Tuesday in the 2017 death of Jordan Edwards and the same jury handed down his punishment. He also was fined $10,000.

The verdict marked an extremely rare murder conviction for shootings involving on-duty police officers. His lawyers are expected to appeal.

Oliver was a police officer in the community of Balch Springs when he and his partner responded to reports of underage drinking at the party. Oliver fired into a car carrying Edwards and his friends, later saying he feared the vehicle was moving toward and endangering his partner . Edwards, who was in the front passenger seat, was shot.

The jury deliberated for hours before settling on a prison sentence. Earlier, they heard from Oliver's mother, Linda, who said he was a good man and a devoted father and asked jurors for a five-year sentence, saying her young grandson needs his father's support.

"He needs his father's love. He needs his father's income. He needs his father's guidance," she said.

Oliver's wife also testified, saying in Spanish through an interpreter that she was concerned about their 3-year-old son, who is autistic. But the ex-officer's half sister testified against him, saying she felt compelled to do so after listening to testimony during the trial and that she hoped he "gets what he deserves."

Balch Springs police

Odell Edwards and Charmaine Edwards, parents of Jordan Edwards, react to a guilty of murder verdict during a trial of fired Balch Springs police officer Roy Oliver.  (AP)

That came a day after Edwards' father, Odell Edwards, told jurors that his son always had a smile on his face and dreamed of playing football at Alabama.

Edwards' stepmother, Charmaine Edwards, said Jordan's death left a void in the family and nothing will make it whole again.

"And I'm forever grateful that y'all (saw) it in your hearts, to see that it was wrong. And I'm thankful," she told jurors after they delivered the murder conviction.

Earlier Wednesday, Dallas County district attorney Faith Johnson said Oliver was a "killer in blue" and told jurors they could send a message that bad officers will not be tolerated.

Police initially said the vehicle backed up toward officers "in an aggressive manner," but later admitted that bodycam video showed the vehicle was moving forward as officers approached. Oliver's partner told jurors he didn't believe his life was ever in danger.

Investigators said no guns were found in the vehicle. Oliver was firedfrom the Balch Springs Police Department days after the shooting.

The jury, which featured two black members out of 12 jurors and two alternates, acquitted Oliver on two lesser charges of aggravated assault stemming from the shooting.

It's extremely rare for police officers to be tried and convicted of murder for shootings that occurred while they are on duty. Only six non-federal police officers have been convicted of murder in such cases — and four of those convictions were overturned — since 2005, according to data compiled by criminologist and Bowling Green State University professor Phil Stinson.

Edwards' father has also filed a civil lawsuit in connection to the shooting. The jury's decision is not just about Jordan Edwards, but all other black men and women who have been killed and not received justice, said Daryl Washington, an attorney for the teenager's father.

Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

=>
***********************************************
See Full Article Here: White ex-Texas cop gets 15 years in black teenager’s death
************************************
=>

]]>
2440
Making fantasy reality: Alan Lee, the man who redrew Middle-earthhttps://advice4all.eu/making-fantasy-reality-alan-lee-the-man-who-redrew-middle-earth/ Sat, 22 Sep 2018 12:17:46 +0000 https://advice4all.eu/?p=2436

As the final rediscovered JRR Tolkien book, The Fall of Gondolin, is released, the artist describes his journey from an Uxbridge council estate to working on The Lord of the Rings in New Zealand

Alan Lee

For artist Alan Lee, nature has always provided a gateway to other worlds. Now 71, Lee remembers growing up in Uxbridge, on a council estate that bordered a wilder landscape. It was what you might call a liminal childhood on one side, the recently minted avenues and structures of social housing, on the other, a short walk into this strange landscape of canals and fields and woods.

Its that sense of crossing from one world to another that has informed his work, especially his association with JRR Tolkiens Middle-earth, which has formed a large part of Lees oeuvre over the past quarter of a century.

His latest project is just released: the third rediscovered Tolkien novel, The Fall of Gondolin. Edited by Tolkiens 93-year-old son Christopher, this volume like its predecessors, The Children of Hrin and Beren and Lthien has been assembled from the authors detailed notes. Tolkien, who died in 1973, always intended to publish these prequels to the main Lord of the Rings trilogy.

Illustrator
Lee, pictured in his studio in Devon. Photograph: Harper Collins

Its likely to be the last of the unreleased books, according to Christopher Tolkien. If it is, its a sumptuous volume to end on, illustrated with Lees black-and-white ink drawings and full-colour watercolour plates.

Lee first encountered Tolkien aged 17 while at Ealing Art College. A fellow student gave him a copy of the first in the Lord of the Rings sequence, The Fellowship of the Ring. I was just amazed, he says. I had grown up reading a lot of folklore and mythology, and this had elements that I recognised elves and dwarves and dragons and magic rings. I just devoured it.

Lee left his art and design course, disenchanted, after a year; he had been warned at school in Ruislip not to go to Ealing because it was full of beatniks. Now, he thinks he was too young to appreciate the sometimes outre methods of his tutors. He recalls one morning spent making paper tubes, standing them on end, pushing them over and standing them up again, to provide a photo opportunity for a photographer, who walked in a couple of hours later. It was Lord Snowdon.

Lee took a year out to work as a graveyard gardener, a job that bridged nature and civilisation in the way his Uxbridge childhood had, and also later fed into his Middle-earth work. Walking through the gates of the cemetery was like stepping into a different world, he recalls. It was a portal to a strange realm of overgrown graves and trees.

While he was working the graveyard shift, the entire faculty at Ealing College had departed and been replaced, and when he returned to finish his course he found a much staider atmosphere, heavy on graphic design and advertising. But reading The Lord of the Rings had reignited his childhood love of folklore and myth. While everybody else was working on campaigns for Volvo, things like that, I was quietly sitting there illustrating ancient Irish folk tales, he says.

After leaving college, Lee worked on magazines like Readers Digest and Womens Own, before graduating to book covers. His best-remembered covers adorned Fontana ghost-story anthologies and Alan Garner novels, including The Weirdstone of Brisingamen.

Lee also created a series of illustrated books on fantasy, which came to the attention of Jane Johnson, an editor at Allen & Unwin and responsible for the Tolkien list. She showed his work to Christopher Tolkien, who agreed that Lee was the perfect choice to illustrate a lavish edition of The Lord of the Rings, to be released in 1992 to mark the centenary of Tolkiens birth.

That was the start of Lees 20-year association with Tolkiens world. What would the 17-year-old art student think, if Lee could go back and tell him that he would one day illustrate the series? I would have been amazed, he says. At that age, I didnt even think that illustration could be a proper job, or at least, not for me. I grew up on a council estate, I failed my 11-plus exams.

Fall
Alan Lees depiction of the city of Gondolin. Photograph: Harper Collins

If that would have amazed the teenage Lee, what came next would have blown his mind. Lee had just moved to the edge of Dartmoor when he was contacted by the director Peter Jackson, who was about to adapt The Lord of the Rings for film and wanted Lee on board to help create the look of Middle-earth. Would he be free to go to New Zealand for six months?

That turned into six years, Lee laughs. I lived out there while all three films were done. I was probably the last member of the crew left there, doing the final promotional art work.

New Zealand was another gateway that has haunted his life. It has a real otherworldliness, he says. Perfect for Middle-earth such a mixture of alpine landscapes, volcanic scenery, heath and rocks.

After returning to Devon, Lee illustrated the first of Christopher Tolkiens edited books based on his fathers early work, which became The Children of Hrin, published to great acclaim in 2007.

However, Lee barely had time to catch his breath before director Guillermo del Toro came knocking, looking for his help in the world of The Hobbit. (Del Toro would later forfeit the project to Jackson.) They wanted me back in New Zealand for six months, Lee says. Nobody at that time mentioned it was going to be a trilogy, though I ended up staying for another six years.

With no more films on the horizon, Lee is happy to be back in his studio on Dartmoor, where he predominantly works in watercolours and experiments with digital techniques he learned in New Zealand. He has just done a fairly exhausting UK tour to promote The Fall of Gondolin, taking in two cities a day for talks and signings.

Hell be glad to return to Devon another of those gateways where he looks out from his converted barn on to the untamed landscape of Dartmoor. Hes got another book to work on: a Hobbit sketchbook featuring his work on both films and books.

I have to admit, he says, Im at my happiest when Im sitting in my studio with a brush in my hand.

Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

=>
***********************************************
Read More Here: Making fantasy reality: Alan Lee, the man who redrew Middle-earth
************************************
=>

]]>

As the final rediscovered JRR Tolkien book, The Fall of Gondolin, is released, the artist describes his journey from an Uxbridge council estate to working on The Lord of the Rings in New Zealand

Alan Lee

For artist Alan Lee, nature has always provided a gateway to other worlds. Now 71, Lee remembers growing up in Uxbridge, on a council estate that bordered a wilder landscape. It was what you might call a liminal childhood on one side, the recently minted avenues and structures of social housing, on the other, a short walk into this strange landscape of canals and fields and woods.

Its that sense of crossing from one world to another that has informed his work, especially his association with JRR Tolkiens Middle-earth, which has formed a large part of Lees oeuvre over the past quarter of a century.

His latest project is just released: the third rediscovered Tolkien novel, The Fall of Gondolin. Edited by Tolkiens 93-year-old son Christopher, this volume like its predecessors, The Children of Hrin and Beren and Lthien has been assembled from the authors detailed notes. Tolkien, who died in 1973, always intended to publish these prequels to the main Lord of the Rings trilogy.

Illustrator
Lee, pictured in his studio in Devon. Photograph: Harper Collins

Its likely to be the last of the unreleased books, according to Christopher Tolkien. If it is, its a sumptuous volume to end on, illustrated with Lees black-and-white ink drawings and full-colour watercolour plates.

Lee first encountered Tolkien aged 17 while at Ealing Art College. A fellow student gave him a copy of the first in the Lord of the Rings sequence, The Fellowship of the Ring. I was just amazed, he says. I had grown up reading a lot of folklore and mythology, and this had elements that I recognised elves and dwarves and dragons and magic rings. I just devoured it.

Lee left his art and design course, disenchanted, after a year; he had been warned at school in Ruislip not to go to Ealing because it was full of beatniks. Now, he thinks he was too young to appreciate the sometimes outre methods of his tutors. He recalls one morning spent making paper tubes, standing them on end, pushing them over and standing them up again, to provide a photo opportunity for a photographer, who walked in a couple of hours later. It was Lord Snowdon.

Lee took a year out to work as a graveyard gardener, a job that bridged nature and civilisation in the way his Uxbridge childhood had, and also later fed into his Middle-earth work. Walking through the gates of the cemetery was like stepping into a different world, he recalls. It was a portal to a strange realm of overgrown graves and trees.

While he was working the graveyard shift, the entire faculty at Ealing College had departed and been replaced, and when he returned to finish his course he found a much staider atmosphere, heavy on graphic design and advertising. But reading The Lord of the Rings had reignited his childhood love of folklore and myth. While everybody else was working on campaigns for Volvo, things like that, I was quietly sitting there illustrating ancient Irish folk tales, he says.

After leaving college, Lee worked on magazines like Readers Digest and Womens Own, before graduating to book covers. His best-remembered covers adorned Fontana ghost-story anthologies and Alan Garner novels, including The Weirdstone of Brisingamen.

Lee also created a series of illustrated books on fantasy, which came to the attention of Jane Johnson, an editor at Allen & Unwin and responsible for the Tolkien list. She showed his work to Christopher Tolkien, who agreed that Lee was the perfect choice to illustrate a lavish edition of The Lord of the Rings, to be released in 1992 to mark the centenary of Tolkiens birth.

That was the start of Lees 20-year association with Tolkiens world. What would the 17-year-old art student think, if Lee could go back and tell him that he would one day illustrate the series? I would have been amazed, he says. At that age, I didnt even think that illustration could be a proper job, or at least, not for me. I grew up on a council estate, I failed my 11-plus exams.

Fall
Alan Lees depiction of the city of Gondolin. Photograph: Harper Collins

If that would have amazed the teenage Lee, what came next would have blown his mind. Lee had just moved to the edge of Dartmoor when he was contacted by the director Peter Jackson, who was about to adapt The Lord of the Rings for film and wanted Lee on board to help create the look of Middle-earth. Would he be free to go to New Zealand for six months?

That turned into six years, Lee laughs. I lived out there while all three films were done. I was probably the last member of the crew left there, doing the final promotional art work.

New Zealand was another gateway that has haunted his life. It has a real otherworldliness, he says. Perfect for Middle-earth such a mixture of alpine landscapes, volcanic scenery, heath and rocks.

After returning to Devon, Lee illustrated the first of Christopher Tolkiens edited books based on his fathers early work, which became The Children of Hrin, published to great acclaim in 2007.

However, Lee barely had time to catch his breath before director Guillermo del Toro came knocking, looking for his help in the world of The Hobbit. (Del Toro would later forfeit the project to Jackson.) They wanted me back in New Zealand for six months, Lee says. Nobody at that time mentioned it was going to be a trilogy, though I ended up staying for another six years.

With no more films on the horizon, Lee is happy to be back in his studio on Dartmoor, where he predominantly works in watercolours and experiments with digital techniques he learned in New Zealand. He has just done a fairly exhausting UK tour to promote The Fall of Gondolin, taking in two cities a day for talks and signings.

Hell be glad to return to Devon another of those gateways where he looks out from his converted barn on to the untamed landscape of Dartmoor. Hes got another book to work on: a Hobbit sketchbook featuring his work on both films and books.

I have to admit, he says, Im at my happiest when Im sitting in my studio with a brush in my hand.

Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

=>
***********************************************
Read More Here: Making fantasy reality: Alan Lee, the man who redrew Middle-earth
************************************
=>

]]>
2436
Family, lifelong friends and even a US President ensure Aretha Franklin’s funeral is fit for a queenhttps://advice4all.eu/family-lifelong-friends-and-even-a-us-president-ensure-aretha-franklins-funeral-is-fit-for-a-queen/ Sat, 22 Sep 2018 04:28:31 +0000 https://advice4all.eu/?p=2432 artist

Detroit (CNN)Family, friends and the many admirers of Aretha Franklin packed Detroit's Greater Grace Temple on Friday to celebrate the life, legacy and music of the "Queen of Soul."

The funeral was full of mourning and laughter, of rousing gospel music and soulful hymns befitting of the first woman to be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, who won 18 Grammys and a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, among many other honors.
    George W. Bush
    Michael Eric Dyson
    professor
    Queen
    Queen of Soul
    Shirley Caesar
    artist
    Charles H. Wright Museum of African
    Detroit Mayor
    Detroit's Greater Grace Temple
    George W. Bush
    Michael Eric Dyson
    professor
    Queen
    Queen of Soul
    Shirley Caesar
    artist
    Charles H. Wright Museum of African
    Detroit Mayor
    Detroit's Greater Grace Temple

    Presidents pay homage to the 'Queen of Soul'

    Sharpton read a letter from former President Barack Obama, who honored Franklin's legacy and her impact on the country.
    "In the example she set both as an artist and a citizen, Aretha embodied those most revered virtues of forgiveness and reconciliation," Obama wrote.
    "While the music she made captured some of our deepest human desires, namely affection and respect, and through her voice, her own voice, Aretha lifted those of millions, empowering and inspiring the vulnerable, the downtrodden, and everyone who may have just needed a little love."
    Clinton brought a smile to attendees' faces with a touching and humorous tribute, recognizing both Franklin's grace and strength, and professing his admiration for the singer and her resolve.
    Michael Eric Dyson
    "This woman got us all here in these seats today, not because she had this breathtaking talent, which she did ... but because she lived with courage, not without fear, but overcoming her fears.
    "She lived with faith," he continued, "not without failure but overcoming her failures. She lived with power, not without weakness, but overcoming her weaknesses."
    A letter from President George W. Bush was also read, in which he called Franklin a "woman of achievement with a deep character and loving heart."
    A few speakers took jabs at President Donald Trump throughout the day. Sharpton criticized the President for saying after Franklin's death that she had "worked for me on numerous occasions."
    "No," Sharpton said, "she used to perform for you. She worked for us."
    And Michael Eric Dyson, a Georgetown professor who spoke at the funeral, slammed Trump for the same remark.
    "She worked above you," Dyson said. "She worked beyond you. Get your preposition right."

    'It's just my grandma'

    Mourners began filling the church early Friday, while Franklin's fans and dozens of pink Cadillac owners lined up outside, a tribute to the singer's 1985 hit "Freeway of Love" in which she sang, "We goin' ridin' on the freeway of love in my pink Cadillac."
    Franklin's open casket was placed at the front of the church as mourners streamed by in advance of the service. As they passed, they saw the singer's body dressed all in gold, with a long sequin gown and high heels to match her gleaming gold casket.
    Detroit's Greater Grace Temple
    Projected on the walls were the words "A Celebration Fit for the Queen."
    The choir greeted attendees who took their seats in the pews as the processional began, and before long many were on their feet, singing and clapping along.
    The casket was closed at the end of the lengthy processional after the singer's family and friends had said goodbye, and as the choir sang, "Jesus, the Light of the World."
    "Walk in the light," the singers proclaimed as the casket lid was lowered, "the beautiful light. Come where the dewdrops of mercy shine bright."
    Early in the service, Bishop Charles H. Ellis III, who was officiating, asked the congregation to stand and applaud Franklin's family.
    Queen
    "This family has shared their mother, their grandmother, their aunt, their cousin with the entire world," Ellis said. "Let us all stand and thank them for sharing her with us."
    Among the family was Franklin's granddaughter Victorie Franklin, who recalled the woman behind the legendary performer.
    "I remember when I was a kid people used to always ask me, 'What does it feel like to be Aretha Franklin's granddaughter?'" she said. "I would always shrug my shoulders and go, 'I don't know. It's just my grandma.'"
    "Nothing sounded better to me than the way my grandma sings," she added. "Her voice made you feel something. You felt every word, every note, every emotion in the songs she sang. Her voice brought peace."
    professor
    Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan took to the pulpit and said he wanted to rename the city's Chene Park after Franklin, and that he was sending a proposal to the City Council to do so.
    "Our beautiful waterfront jewel will be Aretha Franklin Park," he said, "and when performers from generations to come from around the world come here, they will be reminded they are performing at the home of the 'Queen of Soul.'"

    'She kept right on singing'

    When Rev. Jesse Jackson finally stood up to speak, nearly two hours later than originally scheduled, he highlighted Franklin's impact on the civil rights movement, and how it affected her in turn.
    Queen of Soul
    "She had money and could not buy ice cream, had a car and could not stop to buy gasoline," Jackson said. "Aretha came out of the bowels of our struggle."
    Jackson recalled how Franklin and Harry Belafonte went on tour to help raise funds for the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and the movement. While she was on stage in Houston, Jackson said, tear gas was pumped into the room, forcing the evacuation of the building.
    "She kept right on singing," he said.
    Rev. Jasper Williams Jr. said that Franklin once clashed with her father because he objected to her helping activist Angela Davis get out of jail. "She said, 'Daddy, she is a black woman who had nobody to help her. Period," Williams recalled.

    Service honored Franklin's roots

    Franklin's niece, Sabrina Owens, told CNN the funeral service was designed to recognize Franklin's gospel roots and her love of the church.
    "We knew we wanted to have certain gospel artists like the Williams Brothers and Pastor Shirley Caesar," Owens said. "And there were other people who called us wanting to participate."
    Her family wanted to keep the funeral service private to those closest to Franklin -- though it was being streamed and portions broadcast by major networks -- but worked to provide the singer's fans an opportunity to say goodbye this week, Owens said.
    Shirley Caesar
    Viewings earlier this week at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African-American History and at Franklin's childhood parish, New Bethel Baptist Church, as well as an all-star tribute concert Thursday night, were all planned with the public in mind.
    Isiah Thomas, the former Detroit Pistons player and a friend of Franklin's, told CNN he could hardly believe it was time to say goodbye.
    "Even though you knew over the last couple of months that she was sick and you knew this day was coming and you thought you would be prepared for it -- but now that it's here it really is overwhelming," he said.
    Shirley Caesar, the famous gospel singer and another friend of Franklin's, agreed.
    "I've been wishing and hoping that I will wake up and that this is just a dream," she said.

    Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

    =>
    ***********************************************
    Read Full Article Here: Family, lifelong friends and even a US President ensure Aretha Franklin’s funeral is fit for a queen
    ************************************
    =>

    ]]>
    artist

    Detroit (CNN)Family, friends and the many admirers of Aretha Franklin packed Detroit's Greater Grace Temple on Friday to celebrate the life, legacy and music of the "Queen of Soul."

    The funeral was full of mourning and laughter, of rousing gospel music and soulful hymns befitting of the first woman to be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, who won 18 Grammys and a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, among many other honors.
      George W. Bush
      Michael Eric Dyson
      professor
      Queen
      Queen of Soul
      Shirley Caesar
      artist
      Charles H. Wright Museum of African
      Detroit Mayor
      Detroit's Greater Grace Temple
      George W. Bush
      Michael Eric Dyson
      professor
      Queen
      Queen of Soul
      Shirley Caesar
      artist
      Charles H. Wright Museum of African
      Detroit Mayor
      Detroit's Greater Grace Temple

      Presidents pay homage to the 'Queen of Soul'

      Sharpton read a letter from former President Barack Obama, who honored Franklin's legacy and her impact on the country.
      "In the example she set both as an artist and a citizen, Aretha embodied those most revered virtues of forgiveness and reconciliation," Obama wrote.
      "While the music she made captured some of our deepest human desires, namely affection and respect, and through her voice, her own voice, Aretha lifted those of millions, empowering and inspiring the vulnerable, the downtrodden, and everyone who may have just needed a little love."
      Clinton brought a smile to attendees' faces with a touching and humorous tribute, recognizing both Franklin's grace and strength, and professing his admiration for the singer and her resolve.
      Michael Eric Dyson
      "This woman got us all here in these seats today, not because she had this breathtaking talent, which she did ... but because she lived with courage, not without fear, but overcoming her fears.
      "She lived with faith," he continued, "not without failure but overcoming her failures. She lived with power, not without weakness, but overcoming her weaknesses."
      A letter from President George W. Bush was also read, in which he called Franklin a "woman of achievement with a deep character and loving heart."
      A few speakers took jabs at President Donald Trump throughout the day. Sharpton criticized the President for saying after Franklin's death that she had "worked for me on numerous occasions."
      "No," Sharpton said, "she used to perform for you. She worked for us."
      And Michael Eric Dyson, a Georgetown professor who spoke at the funeral, slammed Trump for the same remark.
      "She worked above you," Dyson said. "She worked beyond you. Get your preposition right."

      'It's just my grandma'

      Mourners began filling the church early Friday, while Franklin's fans and dozens of pink Cadillac owners lined up outside, a tribute to the singer's 1985 hit "Freeway of Love" in which she sang, "We goin' ridin' on the freeway of love in my pink Cadillac."
      Franklin's open casket was placed at the front of the church as mourners streamed by in advance of the service. As they passed, they saw the singer's body dressed all in gold, with a long sequin gown and high heels to match her gleaming gold casket.
      Detroit's Greater Grace Temple
      Projected on the walls were the words "A Celebration Fit for the Queen."
      The choir greeted attendees who took their seats in the pews as the processional began, and before long many were on their feet, singing and clapping along.
      The casket was closed at the end of the lengthy processional after the singer's family and friends had said goodbye, and as the choir sang, "Jesus, the Light of the World."
      "Walk in the light," the singers proclaimed as the casket lid was lowered, "the beautiful light. Come where the dewdrops of mercy shine bright."
      Early in the service, Bishop Charles H. Ellis III, who was officiating, asked the congregation to stand and applaud Franklin's family.
      Queen
      "This family has shared their mother, their grandmother, their aunt, their cousin with the entire world," Ellis said. "Let us all stand and thank them for sharing her with us."
      Among the family was Franklin's granddaughter Victorie Franklin, who recalled the woman behind the legendary performer.
      "I remember when I was a kid people used to always ask me, 'What does it feel like to be Aretha Franklin's granddaughter?'" she said. "I would always shrug my shoulders and go, 'I don't know. It's just my grandma.'"
      "Nothing sounded better to me than the way my grandma sings," she added. "Her voice made you feel something. You felt every word, every note, every emotion in the songs she sang. Her voice brought peace."
      professor
      Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan took to the pulpit and said he wanted to rename the city's Chene Park after Franklin, and that he was sending a proposal to the City Council to do so.
      "Our beautiful waterfront jewel will be Aretha Franklin Park," he said, "and when performers from generations to come from around the world come here, they will be reminded they are performing at the home of the 'Queen of Soul.'"

      'She kept right on singing'

      When Rev. Jesse Jackson finally stood up to speak, nearly two hours later than originally scheduled, he highlighted Franklin's impact on the civil rights movement, and how it affected her in turn.
      Queen of Soul
      "She had money and could not buy ice cream, had a car and could not stop to buy gasoline," Jackson said. "Aretha came out of the bowels of our struggle."
      Jackson recalled how Franklin and Harry Belafonte went on tour to help raise funds for the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and the movement. While she was on stage in Houston, Jackson said, tear gas was pumped into the room, forcing the evacuation of the building.
      "She kept right on singing," he said.
      Rev. Jasper Williams Jr. said that Franklin once clashed with her father because he objected to her helping activist Angela Davis get out of jail. "She said, 'Daddy, she is a black woman who had nobody to help her. Period," Williams recalled.

      Service honored Franklin's roots

      Franklin's niece, Sabrina Owens, told CNN the funeral service was designed to recognize Franklin's gospel roots and her love of the church.
      "We knew we wanted to have certain gospel artists like the Williams Brothers and Pastor Shirley Caesar," Owens said. "And there were other people who called us wanting to participate."
      Her family wanted to keep the funeral service private to those closest to Franklin -- though it was being streamed and portions broadcast by major networks -- but worked to provide the singer's fans an opportunity to say goodbye this week, Owens said.
      Shirley Caesar
      Viewings earlier this week at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African-American History and at Franklin's childhood parish, New Bethel Baptist Church, as well as an all-star tribute concert Thursday night, were all planned with the public in mind.
      Isiah Thomas, the former Detroit Pistons player and a friend of Franklin's, told CNN he could hardly believe it was time to say goodbye.
      "Even though you knew over the last couple of months that she was sick and you knew this day was coming and you thought you would be prepared for it -- but now that it's here it really is overwhelming," he said.
      Shirley Caesar, the famous gospel singer and another friend of Franklin's, agreed.
      "I've been wishing and hoping that I will wake up and that this is just a dream," she said.

      Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

      =>
      ***********************************************
      Read Full Article Here: Family, lifelong friends and even a US President ensure Aretha Franklin’s funeral is fit for a queen
      ************************************
      =>

      ]]>
      2432
      5 things to know about ‘The Hate U Give’, the adaptation of the bestselling novel about police brutalityhttps://advice4all.eu/5-things-to-know-about-the-hate-u-give-the-adaptation-of-the-bestselling-novel-about-police-brutality/ Fri, 21 Sep 2018 19:51:59 +0000 https://advice4all.eu/?p=2427 Amandla Stenberg
      The Hate U Givebrings Angie Thomas' bestselling novel to life.
      Image: Warner Bros.

      Less than two years after Angie Thomas' novel The Hate U Give took the book publishing world by storm, it's made the leap to the big screen.

      Directed by George Tillman Jr., the movie, like the book, centers on Starr Carter (Amandla Stenberg), a teenage girl from the poor black neighborhood of Garden Heights, who attends a private school in the wealthy white neighborhood of Williamson. 

      It's a bifurcated life, but a mostly manageable one for Starr – until the night she witnesses the murder of her childhood friend at the hands of a police officer. 

      The relevance of Starr’s story hardly needs to be explained – but what makes it worth watching is its memorable characters, fine cast, and generous spirit. Here’s everything you need to know about the new movie based on arguably the buzziest YA novel of the past few years.

      1. It feels like a book adaptation, for better or for worse

      If you've read the book, you'd probably like to know whether the adaptation is worthy of the source material. I'll confess I can't say, as I haven't. 

      But by all accounts, it's a faithful telling – perhaps even, on occasion, too faithful. The Hate U Give feels very much like a movie based on a book, relying on Starr's voiceover narration to tell rather than show us some crucial details. At one point, Starr picks up an object and mentally compares its weight to that of a gun; it's a great line, but it sounds like something from the book that was too precious to cut.

      2. Amandla Stenberg is a fantastic lead

      That said, there are reasons to watch the movie even if you’ve read the book and know the story, and chief among them is its star(r).

      Stenberg is riveting from moment one. Starr is a character playing a character – as she explains in voiceover, she code-switches between "Starr Version 1" with her family and community in Garden Heights, and "Starr Version 2" with they's classmates in Williamson – but Stenberg's bright, expressive eyes keep us in tune with the "real" Starr at all times.

      America

      A family meeting in The Hate U Give.

      Image: Erika doss / TIFF

      3. Starr’s family is everything

      Undoubtedly, Stenberg also benefits from the rock-solid cast around them. Starr's family is a tight-knit one, and that means lots of screen time for her parents, Lisa (Regina Hall) and Maverick (Russell Hornsby), and her brothers, Seven (Lamar Johnson) and Sekani (TJ Wright). 

      Mom and dad, who had Starr when they were just teenagers, are so cute together that their daughter refers to them as her OTP (one true pairing). But The Hate U Give doesn't just put them out there as some idealized fantasy – you see the everyday work they've put into making this family strong.

      They talk. They negotiate. They tell their kids the important stuff, even when it's difficult (one of the first scenes has Maverick teaching his children exactly what to do if they're ever pulled over by the cops), and they're there for Starr and her brothers come hell or high water, even when they're scared or uncertain. They're a huge part of what makes The Hate U Give feel so special and so compulsively watchable.

      4. It's a weighty drama that makes room for joy

      And in a movie that deals with cycles of violence, poverty, and crime, the Carters serve as a reminder that love and joy can be passed around within families and communities, too. The Hate U Give has an inherently tragic premise, and yet – unlike so many dramas trying to reckon with heavy issues – it remembers to make room for moments of humor, happiness, and heart. 

      There are jokes. There are moments of celebration. There are cute boys to swoon over (KJ Apa of Riverdale plays Starr's sweet but oblivious boyfriend, Chris), meals to enjoy, and parties to attend. Some of these moments are broken up by bursts of tragedy or violence, because that's just the harsh reality of life, particularly for a black person in America. But The Hate U Give never loses sight of what makes the tough stuff worth enduring.

      5. The personal is the political

      The Hate U Give has so much on its mind, from microaggressions to police brutality to the perils of protest. Yet it never feels preachy or didactic, because it stays so laser-focused on Starr. The film simply takes as fact that the political and the personal are inextricably intertwined.

      The film has no appetite for easy moralizing or simplistic answers, because it's far more interested in showing us how these issues look when they're refracted through real people and real experiences. (Or at least, people and experiences so specifically rendered and lovingly performed that they feel real.) 

      By the time Starr figures out how to speak out, we don't need to be convinced. We've already seen this whole messy, ugly, beautiful world through her eyes, and we already know the power a single voice can yield. 

      Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

      =>
      ***********************************************
      Original Post Here: 5 things to know about ‘The Hate U Give’, the adaptation of the bestselling novel about police brutality
      ************************************
      =>

      ]]>
      Amandla Stenberg
      The Hate U Givebrings Angie Thomas' bestselling novel to life.
      Image: Warner Bros.

      Less than two years after Angie Thomas' novel The Hate U Give took the book publishing world by storm, it's made the leap to the big screen.

      Directed by George Tillman Jr., the movie, like the book, centers on Starr Carter (Amandla Stenberg), a teenage girl from the poor black neighborhood of Garden Heights, who attends a private school in the wealthy white neighborhood of Williamson. 

      It's a bifurcated life, but a mostly manageable one for Starr – until the night she witnesses the murder of her childhood friend at the hands of a police officer. 

      The relevance of Starr’s story hardly needs to be explained – but what makes it worth watching is its memorable characters, fine cast, and generous spirit. Here’s everything you need to know about the new movie based on arguably the buzziest YA novel of the past few years.

      1. It feels like a book adaptation, for better or for worse

      If you've read the book, you'd probably like to know whether the adaptation is worthy of the source material. I'll confess I can't say, as I haven't. 

      But by all accounts, it's a faithful telling – perhaps even, on occasion, too faithful. The Hate U Give feels very much like a movie based on a book, relying on Starr's voiceover narration to tell rather than show us some crucial details. At one point, Starr picks up an object and mentally compares its weight to that of a gun; it's a great line, but it sounds like something from the book that was too precious to cut.

      2. Amandla Stenberg is a fantastic lead

      That said, there are reasons to watch the movie even if you’ve read the book and know the story, and chief among them is its star(r).

      Stenberg is riveting from moment one. Starr is a character playing a character – as she explains in voiceover, she code-switches between "Starr Version 1" with her family and community in Garden Heights, and "Starr Version 2" with they's classmates in Williamson – but Stenberg's bright, expressive eyes keep us in tune with the "real" Starr at all times.

      America

      A family meeting in The Hate U Give.

      Image: Erika doss / TIFF

      3. Starr’s family is everything

      Undoubtedly, Stenberg also benefits from the rock-solid cast around them. Starr's family is a tight-knit one, and that means lots of screen time for her parents, Lisa (Regina Hall) and Maverick (Russell Hornsby), and her brothers, Seven (Lamar Johnson) and Sekani (TJ Wright). 

      Mom and dad, who had Starr when they were just teenagers, are so cute together that their daughter refers to them as her OTP (one true pairing). But The Hate U Give doesn't just put them out there as some idealized fantasy – you see the everyday work they've put into making this family strong.

      They talk. They negotiate. They tell their kids the important stuff, even when it's difficult (one of the first scenes has Maverick teaching his children exactly what to do if they're ever pulled over by the cops), and they're there for Starr and her brothers come hell or high water, even when they're scared or uncertain. They're a huge part of what makes The Hate U Give feel so special and so compulsively watchable.

      4. It's a weighty drama that makes room for joy

      And in a movie that deals with cycles of violence, poverty, and crime, the Carters serve as a reminder that love and joy can be passed around within families and communities, too. The Hate U Give has an inherently tragic premise, and yet – unlike so many dramas trying to reckon with heavy issues – it remembers to make room for moments of humor, happiness, and heart. 

      There are jokes. There are moments of celebration. There are cute boys to swoon over (KJ Apa of Riverdale plays Starr's sweet but oblivious boyfriend, Chris), meals to enjoy, and parties to attend. Some of these moments are broken up by bursts of tragedy or violence, because that's just the harsh reality of life, particularly for a black person in America. But The Hate U Give never loses sight of what makes the tough stuff worth enduring.

      5. The personal is the political

      The Hate U Give has so much on its mind, from microaggressions to police brutality to the perils of protest. Yet it never feels preachy or didactic, because it stays so laser-focused on Starr. The film simply takes as fact that the political and the personal are inextricably intertwined.

      The film has no appetite for easy moralizing or simplistic answers, because it's far more interested in showing us how these issues look when they're refracted through real people and real experiences. (Or at least, people and experiences so specifically rendered and lovingly performed that they feel real.) 

      By the time Starr figures out how to speak out, we don't need to be convinced. We've already seen this whole messy, ugly, beautiful world through her eyes, and we already know the power a single voice can yield. 

      Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

      =>
      ***********************************************
      Original Post Here: 5 things to know about ‘The Hate U Give’, the adaptation of the bestselling novel about police brutality
      ************************************
      =>

      ]]>
      2427
      Instagram Boosts Its Security With a Fave-Worthy Updatehttps://advice4all.eu/instagram-boosts-its-security-with-a-fave-worthy-update/ Fri, 21 Sep 2018 12:12:01 +0000 https://advice4all.eu/?p=2424

      Social media platforms' struggle with safety and security is like a game of Whac-A-Mole. One day, the threat is coordinated bot activity; the next, it's SIM hijackers stealing the identities of regular users. In an effort to protect Instagram users from these and other threats, the company announced a set of features today designed make Instagram feel "safer," including ways to protect your own account and to verify whether the accounts you follow are genuine or not.

      Instagram

      First, all users will soon be able to use a more robust form of two-factor authentication to log into Instagram. Previously, Instagram offered two-factor authentication with a code sent via SMS—better than nothing, but insufficient to protect all Instagram users from having their accounts compromised. (Users with "valuable" handles may be more vulnerable to scams like SIM hijacking, where hackers access a person's phone number and use it to log into their accounts and steal their usernames.) Now, the platform will allow integration with third-party authenticators, like DUO Mobile and Google Authenticator, which supply two-factor codes locally and provide an additional layer of security against account hacking.

      Instagram

      To help users differentiate between real and fake accounts, Instagram will now make it easy to look up information about individual accounts—including the date the account was created, its country of origin, and a record of username changes over the past year. You’ll also be able to see any ads the account is running and similar accounts with shared followers. To surface this information, tap the three dots on an Instagram profile page and select the new tab, “About This Account.” The feature will roll out to accounts with large followings, like celebrities, public figures, and accounts “sharing information related to current events, political or social causes.”

      What's more, accounts with large numbers of followers will now be able to request verification from Instagram. The platform already gives blue checkmarks to some celebrity users and brands—WIRED's Instagram, for example, has one—but the verification process is mysterious, and Instagram hasn’t previously let users request verification. The new verification process involves a request form along with a place to upload a photo of a government-issued photo ID.

      Post Mates

      Instagram says the new changes are part of an effort to make the platform feel safe and to empower users to follow genuine accounts over fake ones.

      “Keeping people with bad intentions off our platform is incredibly important to me,” Instagram’s co-founder and CTO, Mike Krieger, wrote in a blog post today. “That means trying to make sure the people you follow and the accounts you interact with are who they say they are, and stopping bad actors before they cause harm.”

      The platform is also hoping to avoid some of the problems befalling its parent company, Facebook, which has struggled to keep fake accounts, misinformation campaigns, and untrustworthy pages off its service. Facebook said it has deactivated millions of fake accounts this year, and that some malicious actors are becoming harder to trace.

      Instagram is, of course, a different beast. As it grows, it will have to face decisions about how to create community and trust on a global platform of over 1 billion users. Checkmarks and two-factor authentication aren't the end of that story. But they're a good place to start.


      More Great WIRED Stories

      Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

      =>
      ***********************************************
      See Full Article Here: Instagram Boosts Its Security With a Fave-Worthy Update
      ************************************
      =>

      ]]>

      Social media platforms' struggle with safety and security is like a game of Whac-A-Mole. One day, the threat is coordinated bot activity; the next, it's SIM hijackers stealing the identities of regular users. In an effort to protect Instagram users from these and other threats, the company announced a set of features today designed make Instagram feel "safer," including ways to protect your own account and to verify whether the accounts you follow are genuine or not.

      Instagram

      First, all users will soon be able to use a more robust form of two-factor authentication to log into Instagram. Previously, Instagram offered two-factor authentication with a code sent via SMS—better than nothing, but insufficient to protect all Instagram users from having their accounts compromised. (Users with "valuable" handles may be more vulnerable to scams like SIM hijacking, where hackers access a person's phone number and use it to log into their accounts and steal their usernames.) Now, the platform will allow integration with third-party authenticators, like DUO Mobile and Google Authenticator, which supply two-factor codes locally and provide an additional layer of security against account hacking.

      Instagram

      To help users differentiate between real and fake accounts, Instagram will now make it easy to look up information about individual accounts—including the date the account was created, its country of origin, and a record of username changes over the past year. You’ll also be able to see any ads the account is running and similar accounts with shared followers. To surface this information, tap the three dots on an Instagram profile page and select the new tab, “About This Account.” The feature will roll out to accounts with large followings, like celebrities, public figures, and accounts “sharing information related to current events, political or social causes.”

      What's more, accounts with large numbers of followers will now be able to request verification from Instagram. The platform already gives blue checkmarks to some celebrity users and brands—WIRED's Instagram, for example, has one—but the verification process is mysterious, and Instagram hasn’t previously let users request verification. The new verification process involves a request form along with a place to upload a photo of a government-issued photo ID.

      Post Mates

      Instagram says the new changes are part of an effort to make the platform feel safe and to empower users to follow genuine accounts over fake ones.

      “Keeping people with bad intentions off our platform is incredibly important to me,” Instagram’s co-founder and CTO, Mike Krieger, wrote in a blog post today. “That means trying to make sure the people you follow and the accounts you interact with are who they say they are, and stopping bad actors before they cause harm.”

      The platform is also hoping to avoid some of the problems befalling its parent company, Facebook, which has struggled to keep fake accounts, misinformation campaigns, and untrustworthy pages off its service. Facebook said it has deactivated millions of fake accounts this year, and that some malicious actors are becoming harder to trace.

      Instagram is, of course, a different beast. As it grows, it will have to face decisions about how to create community and trust on a global platform of over 1 billion users. Checkmarks and two-factor authentication aren't the end of that story. But they're a good place to start.


      More Great WIRED Stories

      Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

      =>
      ***********************************************
      See Full Article Here: Instagram Boosts Its Security With a Fave-Worthy Update
      ************************************
      =>

      ]]>
      2424