Turns out almost everyone loved that ‘controversial’ Gillette ad about toxic masculinity.

(Ad photo via Procter & Gamble Co.) The social media outrage index isn’t a very accurate way judging how everyday Americans feel about events in the news. Social media platforms, like Twitter and Facebook, are great places for the most closed-minded, opinionated, thin-skinned, and angriest among us to vent their frustrations. But, while those people are foaming at the mouth, most people are going about their day, worrying about making ends meet and thinking about how to care for their families and friends. They’re probably happier, too. If you were on Twitter in the weeks before the Super Bowl you probably would have thought conservatives everywhere were irate over the “controversial” Gillette “Best Men Can Be” advertisement. The nearly two-minute …